• You Keep Using Those (Anatomy) Words… I Do Not Think They Mean What You Think They Mean

    bad vocabulary

    Most people want to seem as intelligent as they really are, if not moreso… if they can pull it off.  At the very least, they don’t want to appear stupid. I’m no different, and I’m sure you’re not either. So in that vein, I’m giving you a word(s) check today. Here are the most misused words I hear in my practice, how they’re misused, as well as the proper words/terms/definitions as needed. They’re in no particular order.

    • Quads – Quads is short for quadricep group. These are the muscles that make up the front and outside portion of the thigh, yes… there is one quadricep muscle located on the side of your thigh. There are 4 (four) muscles that make up this group (quad means four)… it is NOT 1 muscle referred to as THE quad. Some people confuse these muscles with the hamstrings and say “my quads” as they point to the back of their thigh.  If you do this, you’re massage therapist will not be impressed.
    • Hams – Short for Hamstrings, these 3 muscles are located on the back of your thigh. Just like the quads, the hams are a group of muscles as opposed to a single muscle. Some people confuse these muscles with the quadriceps an say “my hams” or “my hamstrings” as they point to the front of their thigh. Don’t do this.
    • Sitz/sits bones – Neither of these are correct. The correct term is “sit bones.”  By itself, “sitz” is not a word, but if you combine it with “bath” you have a valid term for a type of bath that you sit in (preferably on your sit bones) to treat pelvic and/or genital issues. Sits bones is just bad grammar; after all, you don’t sits down, you sit down and these are the bones you should be sitting on. Actually, the  sit bones are a specific part of one of your pelvic/hip bones. If you really want to impress your massage therapist, you can refer to your sit bones as your “ischial (ISH ee al) tuberosities (Too ber OS it ees. 🙂
    • Rotor cuff/ rotary cup (or any other combination of these terms) – The correct term is rotator cuff and it’s basically your shoulder joint and all the muscles, tendons, and ligaments that are part of it. Lots and lots of people call it the rotor cuff, so if you do too, you’re not alone. In fact, I even heard a doctor refer to it as such. But that does not make it right. Maybe it makes me a snob, but my opinion of that doctor dropped a little that day. Here’s your chance to be smarter than a doctor by saying three little syllables… RO-tay-tor. Please?

    Do you say any of these? If so, do you know where you picked it up? Was it something your parents or grandparents said? A teacher? Did you read the term online somewhere? Did a healthcare professional say it? Let me know in the comments.

    Gold stars to everyone who instantly recognized my inspiration for this weeks title. Feel free to leave an associated quote in the comments to let me know you got it.

    Oh yeah, if you like this post, don’t forget to share it.

8 Responses so far.

  1. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die. 😉

  2. Michelle says:

    As a current anatomy student I can appreciate this and chuckled as I nodded my head. Better yet I love that I knew all this!! Haha

  3. Rebecca says:

    I didn’t know about the “sit bath”. Everytime I hear someone say it even doctors they refer to it as “sitz bath” I always thought maybe they used something sudzy in it and thats where “sitz” came from. hahaha Nice to know though 🙂

    • Michelle Doetsch says:

      Actually, it is a sitz bath. Sitz by itself is not a word. The term sitz bath comes from a single German word that means sitting bath. For whatever reason, in English we made it a 2 word term – one word (sitz) of which means nothing without the other.

  4. These are great! I hear a lot of the following: lymth nodes, sisk on my ovary,strip throat, and acid reflex. That rotary cup gets me every time, though. One person told me that the rotary cup and rotator cuff were two different things. Ha!

    • Michelle Doetsch says:

      Ha! I get limp nodes a lot, but I forgot about it until your comment. Oh well, fodder for the next time I do a post like this 😉